Jennifer Fisher, a certifiable cougar at age 42, is accused of having sex with one of her child’s friends.

Authorities say that Jennifer picked up a 15-year-old boy in October of 2015, drove to Millard Central Middle School in Omaha, and had sex with him in her car. She knew the boy because he was friends with one of her own kids. And you thought your mom was good at embarrassing you.

There’s not much out there yet on who Jennifer is, or why she would elect to screw a teenage boy (allegedly), but let’s take a trip down memory lane, shall we?

This appears to be Jennifer practicing her ducklips. (Image: Facebook)
This appears to be Jennifer practicing her ducklips. (Image: Facebook)

Tanya Lynn Wiginton, a 36-year-old Alabama woman, will be spending seven years in prison for raping a teenage boy who she met via a family friend. Myrna Baez, 31, will spend two years in prison for carrying on a series of sexual encounters with a 13-year-old boy, who was the son of one of her friends. And Beth Ann Van Veen of Oregon was sentenced to 14 months in jail for seducing two teen boys.

Of course, it’s perfectly legal for a woman in her 30s or 40s to seduce and sleep with men 18 years and older, and one would think it wouldn’t be particularly hard for a woman to find a willing partner. So, why do so many of these women choose to risk prison by seeking out boys who haven’t graduated high school, and in some cases, middle school?

(Image: Facebook)
Myrna Baez (Image: Facebook)

Well, studies indicate that female sexual predators aren’t as rare as we once thought. But men are less inclined to report it, perhaps because of the notion mentioned above. We’re inclined to think that women should have an easy time finding sex, because men always want to have it. Men are often conditioned to perceive sex as a worthy pursuit, and therefore may feel as though they can’t report unwanted sex, lest it make them less masculine.

According to the report:

“Male victims may experience pressure to interpret sexual victimization by women in a way more consistent with masculinity ideals, such as the idea that men should relish any available opportunity for sex (Davies & Rogers, 2006). Or, sexual victimization might be reframed as a form of sexual initiation or a rite of passage, to make it seem benign. In some cases, male victims are portrayed as responsible for the abuse. Particularly as male victims move from childhood to adolescence, they are ascribed more blame for encounters with adult women.”

As for the women, many of the ones we write about in these very pages often try to explain their behavior by citing loneliness. Perhaps they’re looking for the kind of adulation and appreciation they believe only a young, inexperienced boy could provide? It’s still creepy, and we’re still perplexed.